Today Senator Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), Chairman of the Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism, announced the following witnesses for the hearing entitled “How Corporations and Big Tech Leave Our Data Exposed to Criminals, China, and Other Bad Actors.” The hearing will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, November 5 at 2:30 p.m. ET in room 226 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Senator Hawley invited Apple and TikTok executives to testify. Both companies have thus far declined to appear but the invitation remains open and the committee will have chairs for them during the hearing.

Mr. Tom Burt, Corporate Vice President of Customer Security and Trust, Microsoft

  • Mr. Burt leads Microsoft’s Customer Security and Trust (CST) team, leading engineers, lawyers, policy advocates, project managers, business professionals, data analysts, and cybercrime investigators to manage company cybersecurity. Mr. Burt’s team formulates cybersecurity policy globally, advancing the Digital Geneva Convention, the Tech Accord, and the Defending Democracy Project. He also collaborates with public and private organizations to disrupt cyberattacks and support deterrence efforts. Mr. Burt joined Microsoft in 1995 and has held several leadership roles in the Corporate External and Legal Affairs Department.

Ms. Kara Frederick, Fellow for Technology and National Security Program, Center for a New American Security

  • Ms. Frederick is a Fellow for the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). Before joining CNAS, Ms. Frederick helped create and lead Facebook’s Global Security Counterterrorism Analysis Program. She was also the team lead for Facebook Headquarters’ Regional Intelligence Team in Menlo Park, California. Prior to Facebook, she served as a Senior Intelligence Analyst for a U.S. Naval Special Warfare Command, and spent six years as a counterterrorism analyst at the Department of Defense. While at the Department of Defense, she deployed three times to Afghanistan in support of special operations forces, served as a briefer to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict and as a liaison to the National Security Agency. Ms. Frederick received her M.A. in War Studies from King's College London and her B.A. in Foreign Affairs and History from the University of Virginia.

Mr. William A. Carter, Deputy Director and Fellow, Technology Policy Program, The Center for Strategic and International Studies

  • Mr. Carter is Deputy Director of the Technology Policy Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). His research focuses on international cyber and technology policy issues, including artificial intelligence, surveillance and privacy, data localization, cyber conflict and deterrence, financial sector cybersecurity, and law enforcement and technology, including encryption. Before joining CSIS, he worked in the Goldman Sachs Investment Strategy Group, where he performed research and analysis on geopolitics and the macroeconomy. While at Goldman Sachs, he also produced reports and presentations on international affairs’ and current events’ impact on markets.

Mr. Klon Kitchen, Senior Research Fellow, Technology, The Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy, The Heritage Foundation

  • Mr. Kitchen leads tech policy at the Heritage Foundation. As Heritage’s first Senior Fellow for Technology, National Security, and Science Policy, he steers an enterprise-wide, interdisciplinary effort to understand and to shape the Nation’s most important technology issues. His research focuses on the intersection of technology and national security, with a particular interest in artificial intelligence, autonomous weapons systems, space, and intelligence issues. Before joining Heritage, Mr. Kitchen was National Security Advisor to Senator Ben Sasse and spent more than 15 years in the United States Intelligence Community working on counterterrorism, counterproliferation, covert action, and cyber issues.